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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
to say the agreements with israel regarding the easing of the blockade and with egypt, are very vague. they're being negotiated today. i mean they're an agreement to, to negotiate things about them. which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary, they may be very, very limited, and they may never materialize at all what hamas has gained is first of all a certain diplomatic breakthrough. the amir of qatar went there before this happened. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there the foreign minister of durky and foreign minister of tunisia went there. the prime minister of turkey may go. what hamas has been able to do is bring -- >> break out of its diplomatic cage a little bit. that's the benefit. the other thing is that this is a benefit to the people, the hamas factions in gaza who are fighting an internal power struggle with the external leadership that used to be based in damascus and is now disbursed all over the world. i think for different factions in hamas they've achieved things politically for themselves. the people of gaza may be in a sense o
they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
will watch over the next few days. one more thing. it is important to remember egypt is the largest country in the region by population. it clearly has sway over the stability of the region. we have seen that recently in the conflict between hamas or the minutes and the israelis. is it your sense that things are teetering? the whole region seems to teeter with it. >>reporter: when you have such a large crowd in a square with tear gas and rocks being thrown it can be sparked off, bad things can happen, when a few people are killed. it can lead to worst things happening. the other side has shown some real restraint. we saw consolation of a protest movement by the muslim brotherhood today. if you get both sizes demonstrating, that is a recipe for disaster, the other side has held back. >>shepard: so far, steve. thank you very much. >> the important thing here is, remember, it is presidential morsi who helped bring together this truce teen the israelis and hamas and the palestinians. if there are problems with morsi or situations change in egypt and theon is destagized that is as serious as any
the crisis in egypt or push that country into further chaos. that is one of our big stories. we're glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
. >>> plus, the people of egypt trying to avoid trading one dictator for another. fighting back against a president who gave himself new powers. tonight a potential crisis point as the leader tries to put himself above the law. and how will the u.s. handle this? >>> plus, the chances of winning are ridiculously low. but millions of us are still lining up for a shot at a record powerball jackpot. >> lucky, lucky, lotto win. >> shepard: tonight a look at the actual odds of winning it all. but first from fox this tuesday night, three republican senators now say they cannot support the u.n. ambassador, susan rice, for secretary of state. at least until they get more answers about her comments about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. president obama has not yet even nominated her. but the white house says she is enormously qualified. senators john mccain, lindsey graham and kelly ayotte say they're even more troubled now after meeting with ambassador rice. the attack on libya on september 11 killed the u.s. ambassador, cries stevens and three other americans. five days later, amba
the weapons to egypt and hold the egyptian government responsible for hamas abide big the truce. so it is not about what both sides don't want, because they both want to avoid war, but what they want to come out of this appearing victorious or at least gained within their own political frameworks, and this is what is difficult for the egyptian media to bring these two sides together. >> thank you, so much from gaza. be safe. >>> and now to the middle east where president obama is now in cambodia, the third and the final stop on a multiday and multicountry tour. the president arrived in cambodia at 5:00 a.m. eastern time, and becoming the first sitting u.s. president to visit there. while in cambodia, the president is going to be meeting with a leaders at a dinner of the asian summit. and yesterday he made a historic meeting in myanmar where he met with parliament elected leader aun san suu kyi. >> this is not an endorsement of the burmese government, but it is an acknowledgment that there is a process under way inside of that country that even a year and a half, two years ago, nobod
with us. who was the strongest player in that whole period? it was egypt. egypt was strong because egypt has peace with israel. the way to be strong is not by making war and unilateral declarations in the u.n. that have no meaning. the way to gain strength is to be a partner. >> is the cease-fire holding? >> cease-fire's holding so far. >> and you thank egypt's president mohamed morsi for that? >> he is so far now proving to be a constructive partner certainly as proven in this last operation. >> is he honoring the peace treaty with israel? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wa
this before. the government in egypt shut down the internet last year during the revolution there that toppled mubarak. same thing with government in libya. in the months before rebel fighters took down that regime and ousted and then killed gadhafi. sometimes governments have also blocked access to the internet in smaller, more directed ways like pakistan and bangladesh turning off youtube this year on account of that insane islamophobic video that sparked protests across the muslim world. just this week the government in tajikistan turned off facebook after people started posting mean things on facebook about the president of tajikistan who apparently is a wuss. pakistan, they blocked twitter for a day because of a, quote, blasphemous cartoon contest. this kind of thing happens. government shuts off parts of the internet or the whole darn thing. because this is a thing governments do to their people, preserving access to the internet and means of communication that the internet affords us, that has become a significant part of the way the u.s. interacts with other countries. it's become a si
-fire or a truce. they tried doing that a day ago using egypt as the intermediary, that fell through. now egypt has taken its ambassador out of israel, so who will do the mediation and who will try to get in between these two warring factions and try to get them to come together to stop this is going to be a real difficult, a real problem, i think, for the time being. but israel is saying, look, if you keep send rockets into our country, we are going to respond and we are going to respond with force. >> sara sidner inside gaza. >> wondering about that response inside the neighboring country. >>> coming up, how the president will pay personal attentions to the victims of sandy, just hours from now. [ boys screaming ] hi, i just switched jobs, and i want to roll over my old 401(k) into a fidelity ira. man: okay, no problem. it's easy to get started; i can help you with the paperwork. um...this green line just appeared on my floor. yeah, that's fidelity helping you reach your financial goals. could you hold on a second? it's your money. roll over your old 401(k) into a fidelity ira and take control of
and israel exchanged rocket and shell fire. in november 13, is real and hamas said messages via egypt indicating interest in a truce, but then it degraded from there. at the question is whether egypt can play a role, or the united states which has sent hillary clinton, can play a role. the israelis debate a ground invasion of your reporting from gaza city, the olive orchards, they lied to enter the border. monday the area was a virtual no mans land. hundreds of families have fled. it says that gazana are not the only ones encouraged about a ground invasion. talks in cairo, continue in cairo. let us hear from on next call, terry in maryland, on our line for republicans. caller: america has no real influence in the middle east. i say that because we have been trying to negotiate this cents ronald reagan. and if we had any influence with the arab-speaking population, we basically would have succeeded by now. the reality is, for half of the countries, we are nothing more than ana tm, and the other half, -- we are nothing more nothingan atm and for the others we are nothing more than an an
. they control hamas. they're right now agitating. they're agitating probably egypt. >> lebanon presumably? >> yeah. yeah. >> what concerns me as somebody who's covered this story for a long time, if tensions heat up with hamas and gaza, heat up with hezbollah from lebanon and iran working on its nuclear program, look what's happening israel's neighbor in the north, syria, there's potential there are for huge explosion. >> yeah. there's a powder keg potential. there's another reason why this administration has leverage, strength now that the president won should push once again for an israeli/palestinian agreement. >> with the palestinian authority. >> with the plo, two-state solution. push that. get the israeli supportive. but right now i can understand what israel's doing, defending itself. >> two years ago almost to the day you went to north korea. i went with you. spent six days in pyongyang. since then there's a new leader, kim jong-un, the young man now the leader of north korea. you studied this closely. i'm curious, do you see significant changes yet positive changes, negative chan
've pulled your ambassador out of cairo. is that peace treaty stween israel and egypt on the verge of collapse? >> it's vital not just for israel, egypt, it's vital for the entire region, for the world. we understand this. we think the egyptians understand this full well. the egyptians have played a constructive role in the past mediating -- i think they can play the similar role today. >> are they? >> i think they can. >> but are that? >> that's all i can say right now is i think they can play a constructive role. and we hope they will. >> that suggests to me they're not yet doing that. >> well, right now the situation's very fluid on the ground. and hamas shows every intention of escalating further. it's not stepping down. >> mr. ambassador, thanks very much for coming in. we're watching this situation very, very closely. >> thank you, wolf. >> michael oren is the israeli ambassador to the united states. in our next hour we're going to take a look at what the u.s. -- if the u.s. can do anything about this escalating violence that's going on, the tensions escalating between the is
for the opportunity to brief you today on my three- day visit to egypt, israel, the occupied palestinian territory, and jordan. since the situation in does that and israel escalated last week, i made it my priority to contribute to halt the violence with a priority aim of protecting civilians. i canceled a previously planned trip to travel to the middle east as a signal for the need for international diplomatic mobilization and prevent the further escalation that would put the region at risk. to strengthen the commendable efforts by egypt to reach a cease-fire. i want to welcome the cease- fire announcement. i commend the parties for stepping back from the brink and commend the president of egypt for his exceptional leadership. our focus now must be on ensuring that the ceasefire holds and all those needs in gaza, and there are many, that they receive the aid that they need. as i assure their relief for the as i assure their relief for the people in gaza and israel and in the international community, that the violence is stopping. but we are all aware of the risk, and we are all aware that many de
do. bill: here we have new protests break out in egypt. have a look at this. [chanting] bill: apparently these are ultraconservative muslims rallying demanding egypt's new constitution be placed on islamic law or sharia law. moderate -ts and liberals pier it could endanger civil liberty. this is after mubark's regime was taken out last year. martha: we are learning that there could be some big changes at the top of the cabinet level positions in washington. including possibly attorney general eric holder that told a group of students yesterday that he doesn't know if he will stay in his job. >> i have to really ask myself the question about, you know, do i think that there are things that i still want to do? do i have gas left in the tank? it's been an interesting and tough four years. so i just really don't know. i don't know at this point. martha: interesting and tough is a good way to describe what the last term has been like for eric holder. joined now by chris wallace ""fox news sunday"" good morning. >> good morning, martha. martha: it's atmosphere interesting for a pre
don't think that's the objective here. >> so you mentioned the egypt n egyptians in the past, given the instability right now in egypt, is the new egyptian government poised at all to play a role here? >> i mean in the old days under mubarak you have the intelligence chief who passed from the scene try to broker something between israelis and hamas. he had good contacts with the palestinians and the israelis. you got a different situation here. i mean, hamas is -- as you know, an outgrowth of the muslim brotherhood. i think morrissy will try to walk a fine line, particularly if they're increasing civilian casualties in gaza between blasting, but preserving his relationship and the economic support in the assistance he needs from the international community. he did noes the no wan -- >> aaron david miller, thank you so much with the woodrow wilson international center. good to see you. >> a pleasure. >>> as we reported, president barack obama just lashed out at two republican senators. john mccain and lindsey graham, at his news conference in washington. senators graham and mccain sa
to be answered. thank you. jenna: mounting tensions in egypt at this hour as we continue to watch thousands gather in square r-frplt square r-frpltahrir square. i believe that is a live picture you have there. it appears to be fueling an already volatile situation between the opposition and the new government in egypt. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. >> reporter: this attempt by the government to push through a draft constitution in one day's time was an effort to stem the process it appears to have backfired. we are seeing greater numbers of opposition protestors out on the street today, they seem to be energized by this move by the government. already sharp criticism of this new draft constitution, criticism that it fails to protect the rights of women, also concerns about the role of islamic law in this new constitution. the next step is for a referendum. president morsi has 30 days to put it to a vote across the nation. he has said when the constitution is ratified he will give up the extraordinarys he assumed last week. it was that move by the president that really kicked
profound effect. to explain how, let me take a detour into the air by spring. in egypt last year when the government shutdown the internet and shut down global service, many asked how are they able to do that. what does it mean that they can do that. it's a very important question. but let me focus on another important question that few people asked. how did egypt, to have an internet and a mobile service worth shutting down? the short answer lies in the most important policy accomplishments of the clinton administration that most people, present company excluded, have never heard of. world trade organization agreement on basic telecommunications. back in the 1990s, monopolies operated communication networks in most countries around the world, generally government owned or controlled monopolies. that was the world most of us grew up in. it was before the internet and mobile communications took off, and it's not a coincidence at the end of that world coincided with a take off of mobile and the internet. in any event back then in the '90s, leaders at the white house, at the state depart
with israel and our partner, egypt, to and smuggling of arms into gaza while ensuring the safe passage of humanitarian aid. no nation should have to live in fear of these kinds of attacks. that is why i'm proud that our two countries operated so closely. the iron dome performed remarkably well during the recent escalation. it intercepted more than 400 rockets bound for israeli population centers for roughly 85% success rate overall. i had the opportunity to see the life-saving capability firsthand in august. we traveled to southern israel and visited the iron dome battery in that vicinity. it success is the testament to the ingenuity of the israeli people and the commitment of the united states to israel security. i assured the minister that our strong commitment to iron dome will continue in the future. ,t the president's direction the department continues to work closely with israel's minister of defense to ensure that we are making the necessary investments in iron dome. this spring we have announced that we would provide $70 million in fiscal 2012 and top of the 205 million previou
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)